Showing posts with label Ringo Starr. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Ringo Starr. Show all posts

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Ringo issues free download for U.S. Inauguration Day

Ringo Starr will release a free download of his U.N. International Day of Peace song "Now the Time Has Come" to coincide with Inauguration Day in the United States. We'll post a link to the download when available.

Here's the video for the song, which was originally posted last Sept. 21, the UN's Day of Peace. Along with vocals by Ringo, the song includes verses sung by Richard Page, Colin Hay and Billy Valentine. It was co-written with producer Bruce Sugar.

Friday, September 16, 2016

Beatles Bits

This lovely pic of Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr made the social media rounds in advance of "The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years" premiere this week.


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The New York Fair could've scooped Ed Sullivan by bringing the Beatles to America several months  ahead of their February 1964 U.S. television debut, a former disk jockey claims.
Phil Schwartz said he was on the air at York’s WSBA-AM radio station in the late 1970s when the station’s news reporter Robert Markham read him an interesting article that came through the wire service.

“Anxious to book a popular band for the 1963 Great York Fair, several Fair board members stood around a phonograph listening to an obscure British rock group,” the article said. “After a few songs, the consensus among the board members was clear. This band will never sell out the grandstand. And so, the York Fair refused to book the Beatles.”

The article then quoted former York Fair board member George Hartenstein, who said, “When (the Beatles) played on the ‘Ed Sullivan Show’ several months later, the board realized they made a mistake.”
 The fair, however, did include performances by Anita Bryant, Guy Lombardo and accordionist Myron Floren.

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Ringo Starr and Yoko Ono are among celebrities lending support to We Are Not Afraid, "a global campaign aimed at raising funds for the refugee crisis and victims of religious and political violence."

According to Rolling Stone, the campaign:

... centers around the song "We Are Not Afraid" by Nigerian singer Majek Fashek.
On September 29th, a video for the track, directed by Kevin Godley, will features images of the 175 artists involved in the campaign holding signs declaring they are "Not Afraid."
All proceeds generated by the project will be donated to Human Rights Watch (HRW) and the International Rescue Committee (IRC).


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The combined sound of the Beatles and their screaming audience at the 1965 Shea Stadium crowd was really loud, new research shows.
Just how loud was the concert? Research conducted by James Dyble from Global Sound Group, which provides audio mixing and mastering services, and shared with Newsweek finds that at 131.35 decibels, the sound within the stadium would have been 28 decibels louder than a jumbo jet flying at 100 feet and 11 decibels louder than a crash of thunder.
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EMI wasn't happy about the Beatles' "Twist and Shout" being used in "Ferris Bueller's Day Off,"  the film's music supervisor recalls.
We paid EMI a huge sum of money at the time --- I think it was $100,000. But [EMI execs] weren't happy, because the song was fucked with: Brass was added in the editing room because there was a brass band [in the film]. When you saw the band playing and you're hearing 'Twist and Shout,' it would've been weird if you didn't hear any brass, so they added it in. I don't know if the Beatles weren't happy, or if EMI wasn't happy, but somebody wasn't happy: You're not supposed to fuck with the music.
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A judge has ordered Sean Lennon to remove a 70-year-old tree in his front yard because it's leaning over the front stoop of his neighbors, the parents of actress Marisa Tomei.
The Greenwich Village soap opera on West 13th St. has been broiling for years as the tree — leaning toward the sun to the west — has slowly twisted and dislodged the wrought iron handrail on the stoop of the Tomei townhouse.

Unable for years to communicate directly with Lennon, who bought his townhouse in 2008 but only recently started to renovate, Gary Tomei, the actress' father, sued Lennon last year for $10 million.
The judge on the case quoted the Beatles in her ruling:
"No one I think is in my tree, I mean it must be high or low, Strawberry Fields Forever (Lennon/McCartney)," James wrote.
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The Daily Mail has a gossipy (surprise!) story about the children of George Martin's first marriage saying they were short-changed in the late producer's will. Unpleasant, but it does share some little covered historical background on Martin and his career.
On one side of the settlement there is his first family, who one old friend described as Martin’s ‘Cinderella’ offspring. On the other, his second — Lady Martin and her children, who have been reaping the rewards of Martin’s success for years.
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Stella McCartney went for a spin in George Harrison's old psychedelic mini.


Friday, August 19, 2016

Beatles Bits: Weekly news roundup

Matt Monro's You Keep Me Swinging: The George Martin Years is a new collection of recordings the British Sinatra-sound-alike made with Sir George before, during and after Martin's association with the Beatles.

The release includes Monro's covers of "Yesterday" and "Michelle," his James Bond theme, "From Russia with Love" and three songs Martin composed himself: “This Time,” “Can This Be Love,” “No One Will Ever Know.”

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A display of vintage posters created for the Beatles' early appearances around Merseyside and in the famed Cavern Club will go on an exhibit as part of International Beatles Week in Liverpool this month.

The exhibit features the work of Tony Booth, who hand-painted the posters for Beatles manager Brian Epstein. Booth also painted advertising posters for NEMS, the Epstein family's group of Liverpool furniture and record stores.


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Paul McCartney was named Britain's top-selling LP artist based on sales of his and the Beatles albums, Billboard reports. Combined, he's hit #1 a record 22 times during his time with the Beatles, Wings and as a solo artist.

John Lennon was ranked at 18, George Harrison at 17 and Ringo Starr at 15.
“Okay, you know how it really feels? It feels unbelievable, because when you write your songs you don't count how well they're doing,” McCartney said in a statement. “I remember when Please, Please Me went to No. 1, that was our first No. 1 record, and it’s a beautiful feeling to suddenly get this [award], I mean it's amazing.

“So thank you to the people for giving it to me, I love you. And thank you to everyone who made it possible by buying the records, we love you too!"
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Ringo Starr talks about streaming music and his own listening habits.
Q: How do you listen to music? Do you stream or listen to vinyl and CDs?

A: At home, I do it all. I love iTunes. Though the Beatles are streaming now and have had a billion streams, I haven’t actually done it myself. If I’m in the car, I usually listen to the radio, 88.5 Northridge [KCSN-FM]. I just love that channel.

...Q: What do you make of the disputes between artists and the streaming services, with artists claiming they aren’t getting paid enough?

A: I like to support the artists. I heard a guy had 12 million streams, and he got a check for $5, which is not fair. I’m not talking about us. The Beatles are doing fine, and we have the power where we can make a deal upfront.

For an artist starting off, there’s no clubs for them to play in. The venues have gone down. It’s very hard now. It’s easier to become a celebrity on a TV show as a band for four months than work solidly.
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Ringo was also the first Beatle to become a great-grandfather this week, Billboard reports.
His press representative confirmed Monday night reports that his granddaughter, Tatia Starkey, and her partner Adam Low welcomed a son, Stone Zakomo Low on Aug. 14.

Tatia Starkey is the daughter of Ringo's son, Zak, who is a drummer for the Who, and has also drummed in the past with his dad's All-Starr Band and Oasis. Tatia Starkey also has a musical career as a member of the band Belakiss.
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Remembering when a Texas radio station was struck by lightning the day after it organized a bonfire of Beatles records in response to John Lennon's "bigger than Jesus" comment.
The station was one of several to host a “Beatles bonfire,” and on Aug. 13, 1966, it invited listeners to come by and burn “their records and other symbols of the group’s popularity” at a gathering.

According to the Beatles Bible, the Grand Dragon of the South Carolina Ku Klux Klan was on hand for the event, where he reportedly made a wooden cross to which he nailed and burned one of the group’s LPs.
The incident brought in plenty of PR for the station, but they weren’t able to capitalize on their newfound notoriety for long. The following day, KLUE’s transmission tower was struck by lightning, hit by a bolt powerful enough to not only wreck their equipment, but actually knock out the news director.
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Paul McCartney discusses the ritual of his pre-show soundchecks.
The soundcheck is actually structured like a gig. You move to piano for some songs; there is an acoustic set; and you paid homage to your roots in "Midnight Special" and the Carl Perkins cover.

We also do [Jesse Fuller's] "San Francisco Bay Blues." Some of these things remind you of other songs in our repertoire, like "Mrs. Vandebilt" [on Wings' 1973 album, Band on the Run] or "Every Night" [on 1970's McCartney]. We don't do them in the show anymore, but [the soundcheck] keeps the songs in there. Depending on the mood, we'll see how experimental we want to get.

There's an old thing, "Don't Let the Sun Catch You Cryin'" – not the Gerry and the Pacemakers one, the Ray Charles one [on the 1959 album The Genius of Ray Charles]. I used to do that with the Beatles in Hamburg. That's a nice thing to pull back. It's an echo of the show. The roadies know, "OK, he's testing that. He's gonna do his pedal there." We run through everything that happens in the show.

But when it comes to the show, it's all in a different form. And we didn't get bored. So the show is interesting now – all that checking we did, but with loads of people instead of a few, with a different set of songs. It keeps it fresh. And it's interesting that it's grown up – a tribal ritual that I've constructed. We all know and trust this ritual.

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The Guardian looks back at its 1966 review of the Revolver LP.

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The Detroit Free Press shares some rare photos from the Beatles' 1966 appearance in that city.


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Three men recount their scheme, in 1966, to meet the Beatles by impersonating opening group, the Cyrkle.
The Beatles weren’t there, but their instrument guy was, and a couple of other people who I later saw pictures of in Beatles books. We went in with a great sense of confidence — Oh, we’re the group that was hired to impersonate the Cyrkle. And they went, “Oh, okay.” Like they didn’t know about it, but it made sense to them. And then, within about 30 seconds, the door opened and in walked the Beatles.

Ringo sort of noticed us and said hi. We introduced ourselves for real at that point and said how we’d gotten in. Ringo thought it was funny that we would do that. He called John over and said, “Listen to this story,” and John had some cheeky response like, “So you wanted to meet us, now you’ve met us.” But Paul was saying, “Hey, George, have a listen to this,” and he played a few bars of what I now realize was the beginning of “Lovely Rita.”

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Video: THE BEATLES MINUTE: Ringo Starr's Drumming in "I Want To Hold Your Hand"

The latest installment of Beatles expert Aaron Krerowicz' examination of different aspects of the band - this one focusing on Ringo's drumming.

Monday, July 25, 2016

Up for auction: Klaus Voormann signed art from Ringo LP booklet

A set of Ringo Starr  art prints signed by Klaus Voormann are going up for auction in Liverpool.

The images originally appeared in lyrics booklet included in vinyl copies of the Ringo LP.



Friday, July 8, 2016

Beatles Bits: Weekly news roundup

Ringo Starr celebrated his 76th birthday July 7 at the Capitol Records Tower in Los Angeles with his annual tradition of requesting fans to think of "peace and love" at noon their local time. He also announced a spate of new fall tour dates for the U.S.

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Is this one of the oldest pictures of Paul McCartney and his brother Mike?
We showed the photograph to Mike McCartney, who told us: “I couldn’t say it is definitely us, but it might well be!

“I’d say there is a 50/50 chance it’s us. We did wear shorts like that with the braces on. Our hair did look like that. And the height difference between the two boys looks right as our kid is 18 months older than me.”


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He fell asleep on the train. When he woke up, Paul McCartney was there.
The train stopped and Paul and his travel companion got up. “Remember last time we were here the doors didn’t open?” said his companion.

Paul nodded and then his eye caught mine. Presumably for want of something to fill the moment, he said: “Last time we were here, the doors didn’t open.”

And I said, “You can’t trust Southeastern trains.”

At which point he gave me a closer look, and saw a red-faced, middle-aged man.

“Have a good evening,” I offered wildly.

“Thank you,” said Paul McCartney, and got off.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Beatles Bits: Weekly news roundup

A batch of letters written to Beatles fans by George Harrison's mother and sister are up for auction.
"Dear Sal", says Louise in another letter. "George is a very happy and kind person, I think he is kind of interested in Patti (Boyd, George's wife between 1966-1977) as she is also quite a jolly person."
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A new German book collects images from more than 200 films featuring or inspired by the Beatles.

http://amzn.to/28Tg8Bo

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Yoko Ono, Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr are among musicians signing a special cover of Billboard magazine that functions as an "open letter" demanding the U.S. Congress to take action on gun control. Nearly 200 other artists, including Lady Gaga, Selena Gomez and Jennifer Lopez, also signed.

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Paul McCartney signed another letter this week, too. This one calls on Congress to reform the Digital Millenium Copyright Act, because it doesn't prevent YouTube from posting music with little or no compensation to the artists. Other signers include Taylor Swift and U2.

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Liverpool's Beatles Story attraction is displaying one of the late Stu Sutcliffe's school report cards.
“The notes provided by a former teacher on the back of the report card make it clear that while Stuart wasn’t necessarily the most academic pupil, from an early age he was considered to have an artistic streak and was happily involved with the arts."

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Phillip Norman, author of the best-selling (but badly aged) Beatles biography "Shout!" along with one about John Lennon and a new one about Paul McCartney, counts down his Top 10 Beatles books for the Guardian. Interestingly, there not one title by leading Beatles scholar Mark Lewisohn, whose "Tune In" Norman really should've read before writing his book on Macca.

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Beatles writer Spencer Leigh has a new book about the Cavern Club and its role in the Beatles story. You can read and excerpt - including some recollections contributed by Paul McCartney - here.

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Paul McCartney's brother, Mike, voted against Britain leaving the European Union.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Ringo Starr makes birthday plea for peace and love in wake of Orlando tragedy

Ringo Starr has made a birthday tradition of asking fans to think of "peace and love" at noon (your local time) on his July 7 birthday, and this year is asking fans to keep those affected by this week's shootings in Orlando especially in mind.

Speaking to The Associated Press, Ringo said:
“I don’t understand that mindset that you could decide to injure and kill a lot of innocent people. I’m really not a supporter of wars either, but you can understand there’s two sides having a go at each other. But this is so random.

“It’s a difficult situation because it just happens. Some guy — so far it’s always some guy isn’t it, not some girl — gets up in the morning and maybe is mad, maybe is angry — we don’t know, I don’t know — and decides to cause a lot of hurt, you know. It’s sad.”
Ringo will be 76 this year.

Friday, June 3, 2016

Ringo Starr plans 2017 album

Speaking with Billboard during the start of his summer All-Starr Band tour, Ringo says he hopes to release a new LP this year.
Starr, who's been recording at his home studio in Los Angeles, tells Billboard that he has eight songs in motion, mostly needing lyrics. Two are co-written with Toto and All-Starr Band guitarist Steve Lukather and will be finished during the upcoming tour. "We've got the tracks down; now we have to write the words," Starr says. "We know where it's going. We've got the idea. We've got the first verse of one of them. The second will be a ballad. We're gonna finish them while we're on the road." Another track, meanwhile, is a collaboration with Dave Stewart originally intended for a country album the two were hoping to make this month before the All-Starr tour was scheduled.

"We thought, 'Well, we'll get some songs together,' so we did," Starr says. "So there's stuff around. We'll do the country album another time now. There's lots you can do."

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Ringo Starr makes cameo in new "Popstar" parody film

Ringo Starr is among celebrities making cameo appearances in the new mockumentary "Popstar" from actor Andy Samberg and producer Judd Apatow. The film opens this weekend.

The film stars Samberg as a Bieber-like singer, along with his backup vocalists played by Jorma Taccone and Akiva Schaffer.

Along with Ringo, the movie include cameos by Mariah Carey and Justin Timberlake.
How did they get them onboard? “All kind of ways,” said Samberg. “Some of them were people we worked with before so we would just call them, or email them. Some we did through reps, some people like Ringo Starr, Judd Apatow was the one who called.”

Jorma added, “We don’t have his number.”

“Yeah, we don’t have Ringo on speed dial,” Samberg said. “But yeah, we just sort of cast a really wide net and had a huge list of people we would love to be a part of it and we were actually really fortunate, a lot of them said yes – clearly, a ton of people.”

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Ringo posts video for new cystic fibrosis campaign

Ringo Starr is among the celebrities supporting a new campaign launched by singer Richard Marx to raise awareness of the lung disease cystic fibrosis.
Marx’s “Take a Breath for CF” campaign, which officially kicks off today, May 27, encourages social media users to post videos of themselves taking a breath in and a breath out and saying, “I’m taking a breath for CF.” It’s an effort to raise awareness of the disease and collect donations to benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.
Here is Ringo's video:

Friday, April 22, 2016

Beatles Bits: Weekly news roundup

Paul McCartney is set to join the Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, the Who, Neil Young and Roger Waters in a 60s dream-time in a Coachella-produced mega festival in California this fall.

The Who's Roger Daltry confirmed the details.
“I think it’s us and Roger Waters on the same day,” he told the Canadian media company Postmedia Network. “It’s a fantastic idea for a festival. It’s the greatest remains of our era.”
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Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr have donated a scarf and necktie, respectively, for a charity auction benefiting  a male cancer awareness charity.

Paul's scarf is the same one he wore on the cover of the Rupert the Bear single "We All Stand Together." You can bid on it here.




And Ringo's autographed necktie here.


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Paul McCartney joined People for Ethical Treatment of Animals in proclaiming Portland, Ore., "the most vegan-friendly city in the nation during his tour stop there this week.
“The City of Roses is the city of the future,” said McCartney of Portland’s creative vegan scene.
The former Beatle was given a box of gourmet vegan cheeses from Vtopia Restaurant & Cheese Shop and seitan cold cuts from Homegrown Smokehouse and Deli, courtesy of PETA.
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Rihanna has bested the Beatles' Billboard Hot 100 record.
The singer's latest hit Work has scored a ninth week at the top of the Billboard Hot 100, giving her an overall tally of 60 weeks at number one with 14 songs.
That's one more week at number one than The Beatles' overall total.
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See are pics of the Beatles and John Lennon - made from cassette tape!


Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Ringo Starr cancels North Carolina show over anti-LGBT bill

Following the lead of Bruce Springsteen, Ringo Starr has canceled an upcoming show in North Carolina in protest of recently passed discriminatory legislation in the state.
"I'm sorry to disappoint my fans in the area, but we need to take a stand against this hatred," Starr said in a statement. "Spread peace and love.”

Starr was slated to play Cary, N.C. on June 18.

... The controversial legislation prevents in-state municipalities from passing their own anti-discrimination regulations. It also prevents transgender individuals from using the bathroom for the sex with which they identify.

The situation bothers Starr, he said.

“How sad that they feel that this group of people cannot be defended," Starr said in his statement.

Friday, March 25, 2016

Beatles Bits: Weekly news roundup

The so-called "Holy Grail" Beatles record - a 78-r.p.m. acetate Brian Epstein had made of some of the band's Decca recordings - sold for £77,500 at auction this week.

Brian Epstein's visit to the HMV record store in London to have this disk made was pivotal to the Beatles' history.

The engineer there who transferred the Decca recordings to disk, Jim Foy, liked what he heard and was impressed that the songs were Lennon-McCartney originals. That led to Epstein meeting representatives from EMI's music publishing arm and, ultimately, George Martin - who gave the band a recording contract after they'd been rejected by nearly every label in Britain.

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In a considerably better bargain, a Colorado man bought a "butcher cover" version of the Yesterday ... And Today album for $5. This was one of the copies where the offending picture was pasted over with the photo of the Beatles posing amidst luggage.

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Beatles recording engineer Geoff Emerick discusses his role as adviser for "The Sessions," a live touring show that allows audiences to witness recreated recording sessions by the Fab Four, with songs performed by a tribute band.
Although the music is fully licensed, The Beatles do not endorse any tributes. Having Emerick on board as adviser brings an imprimatur of legitimacy to this production. “For all that has been written about it, there was really only a handful of people in the room,” Emerick points out. “George Martin always kept control. There was a sense of calm on his sessions, and a lot of humour. When it’s not fun, that’s when problems start. George was a great enabler and facilitator. But when it comes to genius, if you want to use that word, it came from the band themselves. The Beatles were the originators.”
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French animation studio Superpod is working on a TV adaptation of Ringo Starr's song "Octopus' Garden."
SUPERPROD secured the rights in a deal with Simon & Schuster, Universal Music Publishing and Startling Music. The book Octopus’s Garden features Starr’s lyrics illustrated by Ben Cort, the artist behind Aliens Love Underpants. Superights will represent the international rights for the animated program.
Clément Calvet, the president of SUPERPROD, and Jeremie Fajner, the managing director at SUPERPROD, commented: “We are particularly proud and happy to work on this great book and music. The evergreen song by Ringo Starr and the superb drawings by Ben Cort are a wonderful setting for telling our animated stories. We are thrilled to team up with such great talents and major partners in the music and book publishing industries.”
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Martin Guitars has released a John Lennon model D-28. It'll set you back $5K+.

The new D-28 John Lennon makes its debut at Musikmesse 2016 in Frankfurt, Germany April 7-10 and features John Lennon’s famous self-portrait illustration on the rosewood headplate, along with a beautiful mother-of-pearl, John Lennon themed design inlaid on the ebony fingerboard.


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A provision in U.S. copyright law may help Paul McCartney finally regain some rights over his Beatles songs.
When Michael Jackson passed away, his estate retained the rights to the catalog, but recently the estate sold those rights to Sony/ATV for $750 million. The US Copyright Act of 1976, however, allows songwriters to reclaim the rights to their songs 56 years after they were written. This gives McCartney the chance to recapture his share. 
As Billboard reports, McCartney has already made moves to claim his portion of the Lennon-McCartney collection, filing a termination notice for 32 songs written between 1962 and 1964 with the U.S. Copyright Office on December 15, 2015.

"Only the McCartney half of the Lennon/McCartney songs are eligible for termination, and only for the US," a source told Billboard. "Sony/ATV still owns [those] Beatles songs in the rest of the world."